A Mischief Of Magpies

If the Sun were the size of a beach ball then Jupiter would be the size of a golf ball and a Mischief of Magpies would be as small as a pea.

Wednesday, October 19, 2005

End of the Big Beast

I was going to post here about the hilarious story of the tower project manager stuck half-way up his own great glass elevator in Portsmouth, but Steve has beaten me to it, so read his site about that instead. It even has an Aerosmith reference, what more could you want.

Instead, I'll rant about one of the easier targets in the last few years other than the United States of America: the Conservative Party. They've gone and done it again. Not content with electing three absolute no-marks in a row as leader (well, four if you count John Major, as many do, but for whom I actually have some respect, as he won an election with the party falling down around his ears), they've actually voted off - at the first possible opportunity - the only truly credible candidate for Tory leader. Now, I'm not saying that Ken Clarke is perfect; indeed, some parts of his lifestyle are tantamount to political suicide, e.g. his seat on the board of British American Tobacco. However, as somebody who has no deep-seated affiliation to any particular political party, he's the only Tory I could ever vote to become Prime Minister. The Tory MPs have once again decided that they need somebody they like rather than somebody that the public would like.

The MPs probably considered that Clarke would rip the party in two over the issue of Europe. That's a valid concern, but if you look at the remaining candidates, I fail to see how the party isn't going to be ripped apart by Labour and the Lib Dems anyway. By failing to go for somebody with the charisma to gain public support, they've once again let off the hook a Labour government that is getting away with absolute murder (figuratively and, on foreign soil, literally). Liam Fox is too right-wing even for the Tories, which leaves a straight battle between David Cameron and David Davis. David Davis doesn't inspire much confidence in me, I have to say. He reminds me of a cross between a deputy headteacher and a used-car salesman, always wanting to be trusted and respected but never quite managing it. This leaves David Cameron, who has all the youthful drive and verve of someone high on drugs (appropriately). However, the following from BBC News says it all really:

'Meanwhile, Adam Holloway [MP for Gravesham] said he had defected from Mr Davis to Mr Cameron in Tuesday's vote.

But he told BBC Two's Newsnight of his "niggling doubt" that Mr Cameron would be "eaten alive" by Prime Minister Tony Blair and Chancellor Gordon Brown.'

Eaten alive, chewed up and spat out. True to recent Tory form it is then.